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Expo 15 SR 5

People plotting: Creating unique characters – Part three

Posted by on Jan 21, 2022 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

A good exercise is to invent two characters based on pictures. Creating a facial description is relatively simple, although you also need to determine if the people are tall or short, their body type, approximate age, and so on. You then need to add as much information as possible about each person – personality, mannerisms, jobs, career path, friends and family, likes and dislikes, hopes and dreams, hobbies, pets, favourite foods and drinks, what part of the world they live in, the type of house they have or the car they drive, even...

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People plotting: Creating unique characters – Part two

Posted by on Jan 17, 2022 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

The best writers create characters that you instantly feel that you’d recognize on the street if they came to life. So what kinds of things make us different? Everyone doesn’t like the same food and some are allergic to certain things. People are sometimes described as dog people or cat people but some might be neither or be allergic to dogs, cats, or both, affecting their choice of pets. We all have different likes and dislikes, or specific hopes and fears, things that help to determine our personality. People’s voices are often...

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People plotting: Creating unique characters – Part one

Posted by on Jan 12, 2022 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

Let’s imagine that you’ve thought of a great premise for a story and even crafted a general plot. You then need to develop some characters to inhabit the world you’re intending to create. So where do ideas for characters come from? How do successful authors invent people for their stories, those imaginary men, women, children, and even animals that are a perfect fit for the story? Let’s be honest, ideas for characters can come from just about anywhere – on the train, street, plane, TV, movies, pictures and photographs, historical...

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The Many Benefits of a Writing Coach

Posted by on Jan 8, 2022 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

A professional writing coach is someone with whom you can consult, ask questions and receive constructive feedback. They act as a guide as you build your career as a professional writer. A coach can help you conquer a stumbling block, regain momentum or make a start on a new project. My program helps you progress as a writer. You decide what you want to work on during a personalized, one on one relationship. I can be your coach for just one month or we can establish a month-to-month arrangement, depending on your schedule and...

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Seeing the Light: Writers and Seasonal Affective Disorder – Part Six

Posted by on Dec 29, 2021 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

Regular physical exercise can help with stress relief and prevent the onset of SAD. Feeling more fit makes you feel better about yourself overall and generally improves your mood. Giving in to those winter blues can also be stressful and lead to overeating, overindulgence in alcohol or other unhealthy pursuits, so you need to take care of your body, watch your diet and get enough sleep. Make time to relax and get away from your writing once in a while, especially if you work at home.  And even if you do suffer from cabin fever, make sure...

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Seeing the Light: Writers and Seasonal Affective Disorder – Part Five

Posted by on Dec 21, 2021 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

Many people are adversely affected each year by the winter blues and writers are no exception. There are many ways to combat SAD, including antidepressants and other medications, but bright artificial light treatments are common as a means to give the body more exposure to the light that is lacking once winter approaches.  For SAD sufferers, shorter days and long nights can initiate depression, excessive fatigue and other issues. Not simply the ‘winter blues’, Seasonal Affective Disorder is recognized as a form of depression, which can...

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Seeing the Light: Writers and Seasonal Affective Disorder – Part Four

Posted by on Dec 18, 2021 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

In ancient Greece and Rome, the works of Plato, Aristotle, Virgil and others may have been composed at night, with very little illumination. Monks in the Middle Ages would also have worked all year round and such works as Beowulf or the Anglo Saxon Chronicle would never have been written if everyone in the scriptorium had SAD.  Did Shakespeare only write in the spring and summer? Candlelight was his only option if he chose to write his plays and sonnets after the sun had set. The same applied to Samuel Pepys, who we can assume wrote at...

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Seeing the Light: Writers and Seasonal Affective Disorder – Part Three

Posted by on Dec 16, 2021 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

So how does SAD affect writers? Are those in Canada, the northern USA, and Scandinavia less prolific in the winter months? Does the cloud cover in Vancouver or in Britain reduce the amount of literary work originating in those areas? Do American writers in Florida create more prose between October and April than their counterparts in Minnesota?  Is a writer in Australia or South Africa more likely to produce a larger body of work because he or she has more sunlight? Many of us may prefer to escape to a sunnier environment each winter if...

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Seeing the Light: Writers and Seasonal Affective Disorder – Part Two

Posted by on Dec 14, 2021 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

Seasonal Affective Disorder is primarily a mood disorder, with sufferers experiencing normal mental health throughout the year, but becoming depressed or generally more down in the winter months. Seasonal variations in a person’s mood may be related to light, or rather the lack of it.  SAD is often more prevalent in higher latitudes and in Finland, for example, the rate for SAD is close to 10%. Winter depression is a common slump in the mood of the inhabitants of Scandinavia. Researchers estimate that up to 20% of the population is...

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Seeing the Light: Writers and Seasonal Affective Disorder – Part One

Posted by on Dec 14, 2021 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

At this time of year, many people in the northern hemisphere notice that its getting a little colder each day and it gets darker much earlier, especially after we alter the clocks for daylight saving time. Many of us develop cabin fever and grow sluggish during the winter months and may eat more or sleep longer when daylight is in short supply and the temperature begins to fall. It may be harder to get out of bed or for some people to even generate much enthusiasm each morning. These are common experiences related to the change in the...

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